GreenTRAP™
Passive Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF)

 

Product photo of GreenTRAP™ Passive Diesel Particulate Filters (DPF)

  • Passive Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) system developed for on-road, off-road and stationary applications.
  • California Air Resources Board (CARB) Verified for stationary applications
  • Great at reducing deadly emissions, such as Carbon Monoxide (CO), Hydrocarbons (HC) and Particulate Matter (PM). Visible smoke is completely eliminated by the filter
  • Compact design with thermal insulation
  • Optional computerized controller with 3 customizable alarms and data logging capabilities
  • System maintenance intervals of 2000 to 6000 hours
  • Stainless steel housing, custom fit available

GreenTRAP™ - Technology

Nett® GreenTRAP™ Diesel Particulate Filters (DPF) utilize cordierite wall-flow monoliths to trap the soot produced by medium to heavy-duty engines in off-road, on-road and stationary applications. The cylindrical filter element consists of many square parallel channels running in the axial direction, separated by thin porous walls, as shown below.

The channels are open at one end and plugged at the other, which forces the particle laden exhaust gases to flow through the walls. Gas is able to escape through the pores in the wall material. Particulates, however, are too large to escape and are trapped in the filter walls and in the inlet channels. A proprietary noble metal catalyst is coated onto the inside surface of the filter monolith. The catalyst lowers the soot combustion temperature allowing the filter to regenerate. The accumulated soot is oxidized in the filter during regular operation of the engine. For about 25-30% of the engine operating time, the exhaust temperatures must be at least 275-300°C (530-575°F) for proper filter regeneration when ULSD (ultra-low sulfur diesel) fuel is used.

The exact temperature requirements change with engine technology, with installations on older, dirty engines requiring higher exhaust temperatures for regeneration. For example, filters installed on older engines with high DPM emissions (e.g., >= 0.30 g/bhp-hr) may require temperatures of 325-400°C (615-750°F). The regeneration also depends on other factors, such as the vehicle duty cycle, filter sizing and type of diesel fuel used. ULSD fuel (S < 15 ppm wt.) is now widely available and should be used whenever possible with any diesel particulate filter.

GreenTRAP™ - Performance

The soot filtration efficiency of the Nett® GreenTRAP™ catalytic Diesel Particulate Filters (DPF) increases with the soot loading in the unit. Even at low soot loads the filter efficiency exceeds 90% (blue line in Figure below). The visible smoke is completely eliminated by the filter, resulting in a dramatic improvement of smoke opacity readings.

Typical exhaust gas pressure drop on a properly regenerating filter is between 5 and 10 kPa (20-40" H2O). There is a relationship between the exhaust gas temperature and the filter pressure drop. Applications with higher exhaust temperatures regenerate better, accumulate less soot in the filter, and experience lower pressure drop. The filter pressure drop is also influenced by the engine-out DPM emissions. Dirty engines with high soot emissions require that more DPM is captured and oxidized in the filter, resulting in higher average soot loading and pressure drop. For this reason, filters are likely to work at a higher pressure drop when installed on high polluting engines.

GreenTRAP™ Diesel Particulate Filters (DPF) Emission Reduction Chart

Gas Phase Performance

Due to the presence of the Oxidation Catalyst, reductions in Carbon Monoxide (CO) and Hydrocarbon (HC) emissions are also observed in the filter.  The gas phase performance of the Nett® GreenTRAP™ filters is similar to that of a standard Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC), as illustrated in the figure below.

GreenTRAP™ Diesel Particulate Filters (DPF) Emission Reduction Chart

GreenTRAP™ - Designs and Options

Standard models of GreenTRAP™ Diesel Particulate Filters (DPF) are listed below. Filter sizing guidelines in the table are approximate. Sizing for particular engines and applications should be consulted with our office before ordering.

 

Nett GreenTRAP™ Diesel Particulate Filters

  Overall Dimensions
 Max. Engine PowerDiameterLength
ModelhpkWinchmminchmm
SA50233256.215714.8376
SA70575568.120618.5470
SA709113858.120622.5572
SA9131621219.624425.5648
SA101722116511.128226.7678
SA112329622111.930230.6777
SA122228821512.732328.6726
SA122836026912.732331.6803
SA133747935813.734834.5876
SA154356342015.739934.2869
SA2077100074620.752638.2970

GreenTRAP™ - Verification

The Nett GreenTRAP™ Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) is a California Air Resources Board (CARB) verified passive diesel particulate filter for stationary applications. The GreenTRAP™ reduces emissions of Diesel Particulate Matter (DPM) consistent with a Level 3 device (greater than or equal to 85% reduction), complies with CARB January 1, 2009, nitrogen dioxide (NO2) limit and is verified as a Level 3 Plus diesel emissions control device.

The California ARB has verified the Nett GreenTRAP™ system for its Airborne Toxic Control Measure (ATCM) for stationary compression ignition engines. The verification covers stationary prime and emergency standby generators and pumps powered by certified off-road diesel engines meeting 0.2 grams per brake horsepower hour (g/bhp-hr) PM or less. The GreenTRAP™ catalytic diesel particulate filter utilizes a wall-flow filter monolith coated with a proprietary catalyst to enable passive regeneration (self-cleaning) at typical diesel exhaust temperatures. Specific engine criteria for which the GreenTRAP™ Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) system has been approved may be found on the Executive Order, posted on the California ARB website: (http://www.arb.ca.gov/diesel/verdev/vt/stationary.htm).

Diesel engines emit a complex mixture of air pollutants, composed of gaseous, liquid and solid materials. The visible emissions in diesel exhaust are known as particulate matter or PM, which include carbon particles commonly referred to as "soot".  In 1998, following a 10-year scientific assessment process, the ARB identified Diesel Particulate Matter (DPM) as a toxic air contaminant based on its potential to cause cancer and other health problems, including respiratory illnesses and increased risk of heart disease. Health risks from Diesel Particulate Matter (DPM) are highest in areas of concentrated emissions, such as near ports, rail yards, freeways or warehouse distribution centers.

To reduce public exposure to Diesel Particulate Matter (DPM), in 2000, the ARB approved the Risk Reduction Plan to Reduce Particulate Matter Emission from Diesel-Fueled Engines and Vehicles. Integral to this plan is the implementation of control measures to reduce Diesel Particulate Matter (DPM) such as the ATCM for stationary diesel-fueled engines. Among other provisions, the ATCM established emission standards and fuel use requirements for new and in-use stationary engines used in prime and emergency back-up applications. In addition to PM, the ATCM establishes emission standards for Hydrocarbons (HC), Nitrogen Oxides (NOx), non-Methane Hydrocarbons and NOx (NMHC+NOx), and Carbon Monoxide (CO).

 

GreenTRAP™ - Technology

Nett® GreenTRAP™ Diesel Particulate Filters (DPF) utilize cordierite wall-flow monoliths to trap the soot produced by medium to heavy-duty engines in off-road, on-road and stationary applications. The cylindrical filter element consists of many square parallel channels running in the axial direction, separated by thin porous walls, as shown below.

The channels are open at one end and plugged at the other, which forces the particle laden exhaust gases to flow through the walls. Gas is able to escape through the pores in the wall material. Particulates, however, are too large to escape and are trapped in the filter walls and in the inlet channels. A proprietary noble metal catalyst is coated onto the inside surface of the filter monolith. The catalyst lowers the soot combustion temperature allowing the filter to regenerate. The accumulated soot is oxidized in the filter during regular operation of the engine. For about 25-30% of the engine operating time, the exhaust temperatures must be at least 275-300°C (530-575°F) for proper filter regeneration when ULSD (ultra-low sulfur diesel) fuel is used.

The exact temperature requirements change with engine technology, with installations on older, dirty engines requiring higher exhaust temperatures for regeneration. For example, filters installed on older engines with high DPM emissions (e.g., >= 0.30 g/bhp-hr) may require temperatures of 325-400°C (615-750°F). The regeneration also depends on other factors, such as the vehicle duty cycle, filter sizing and type of diesel fuel used. ULSD fuel (S < 15 ppm wt.) is now widely available and should be used whenever possible with any diesel particulate filter.

GreenTRAP™ - Performance

The soot filtration efficiency of the Nett® GreenTRAP™ catalytic Diesel Particulate Filters (DPF) increases with the soot loading in the unit. Even at low soot loads the filter efficiency exceeds 90% (blue line in Figure below). The visible smoke is completely eliminated by the filter, resulting in a dramatic improvement of smoke opacity readings.

Typical exhaust gas pressure drop on a properly regenerating filter is between 5 and 10 kPa (20-40" H2O). There is a relationship between the exhaust gas temperature and the filter pressure drop. Applications with higher exhaust temperatures regenerate better, accumulate less soot in the filter, and experience lower pressure drop. The filter pressure drop is also influenced by the engine-out DPM emissions. Dirty engines with high soot emissions require that more DPM is captured and oxidized in the filter, resulting in higher average soot loading and pressure drop. For this reason, filters are likely to work at a higher pressure drop when installed on high polluting engines.

GreenTRAP™ Diesel Particulate Filters (DPF) Emission Reduction Chart

Gas Phase Performance

Due to the presence of the Oxidation Catalyst, reductions in Carbon Monoxide (CO) and Hydrocarbon (HC) emissions are also observed in the filter.  The gas phase performance of the Nett® GreenTRAP™ filters is similar to that of a standard Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC), as illustrated in the figure below.

GreenTRAP™ Diesel Particulate Filters (DPF) Emission Reduction Chart

GreenTRAP™ - Designs and Options

Standard models of GreenTRAP™ Diesel Particulate Filters (DPF) are listed below. Filter sizing guidelines in the table are approximate. Sizing for particular engines and applications should be consulted with our office before ordering.

 

Nett GreenTRAP™ Diesel Particulate Filters

  Overall Dimensions
 Max. Engine PowerDiameterLength
ModelhpkWinchmminchmm
SA50233256.215714.8376
SA70575568.120618.5470
SA709113858.120622.5572
SA9131621219.624425.5648
SA101722116511.128226.7678
SA112329622111.930230.6777
SA122228821512.732328.6726
SA122836026912.732331.6803
SA133747935813.734834.5876
SA154356342015.739934.2869
SA2077100074620.752638.2970

GreenTRAP™ - Verification

The Nett GreenTRAP™ Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) is a California Air Resources Board (CARB) verified passive diesel particulate filter for stationary applications. The GreenTRAP™ reduces emissions of Diesel Particulate Matter (DPM) consistent with a Level 3 device (greater than or equal to 85% reduction), complies with CARB January 1, 2009, nitrogen dioxide (NO2) limit and is verified as a Level 3 Plus diesel emissions control device.

The California ARB has verified the Nett GreenTRAP™ system for its Airborne Toxic Control Measure (ATCM) for stationary compression ignition engines. The verification covers stationary prime and emergency standby generators and pumps powered by certified off-road diesel engines meeting 0.2 grams per brake horsepower hour (g/bhp-hr) PM or less. The GreenTRAP™ catalytic diesel particulate filter utilizes a wall-flow filter monolith coated with a proprietary catalyst to enable passive regeneration (self-cleaning) at typical diesel exhaust temperatures. Specific engine criteria for which the GreenTRAP™ Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) system has been approved may be found on the Executive Order, posted on the California ARB website: (http://www.arb.ca.gov/diesel/verdev/vt/stationary.htm).

Diesel engines emit a complex mixture of air pollutants, composed of gaseous, liquid and solid materials. The visible emissions in diesel exhaust are known as particulate matter or PM, which include carbon particles commonly referred to as "soot".  In 1998, following a 10-year scientific assessment process, the ARB identified Diesel Particulate Matter (DPM) as a toxic air contaminant based on its potential to cause cancer and other health problems, including respiratory illnesses and increased risk of heart disease. Health risks from Diesel Particulate Matter (DPM) are highest in areas of concentrated emissions, such as near ports, rail yards, freeways or warehouse distribution centers.

To reduce public exposure to Diesel Particulate Matter (DPM), in 2000, the ARB approved the Risk Reduction Plan to Reduce Particulate Matter Emission from Diesel-Fueled Engines and Vehicles. Integral to this plan is the implementation of control measures to reduce Diesel Particulate Matter (DPM) such as the ATCM for stationary diesel-fueled engines. Among other provisions, the ATCM established emission standards and fuel use requirements for new and in-use stationary engines used in prime and emergency back-up applications. In addition to PM, the ATCM establishes emission standards for Hydrocarbons (HC), Nitrogen Oxides (NOx), non-Methane Hydrocarbons and NOx (NMHC+NOx), and Carbon Monoxide (CO).

EMISSION REDUCTIONS

Photo Gallery

California ARB GreenTRAP™ Diesel Particulate Filters (DPF) Emission